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Rock of Cashel

Rock of Cashel

Rock of Cashel

Set on a dramatic outcrop of limestone in the Golden Vale, the Rock of Cashel, iconic in its historic significance, possesses the most impressive cluster of medieval buildings in Ireland. Among the monuments to be found there is a round tower, a high cross, a Romanesque chapel, a Gothic cathedral, an abbey, the Hall of the Vicars Choral and a fifteenth-century Tower House.

Originally the seat of the kings of Munster, according to legend St. Patrick himself came here to convert King Aenghus to Christianity. Brian Boru was crowned High King at Cashel in 978 and made it his capital.

In 1101 the site was granted to the church and Cashel swiftly rose to prominence as one of the most significant centres of ecclesiastical power in the country.

The surviving buildings are remarkable. Cormac’s Chapel, for example, contains the only surviving Romanesque frescoes in Ireland.

The Rock of Cashel is one of Ireland’s most spectacular and – deservedly – most visited tourist attractions.

It’s huge, it’s complex, it’s iconic, there is nothing like it anywhere else in the world and it’s right here in Cashel at the heart of Tipperary. The Rock of Cashel (Carraig Phádraig), more formally St. Patrick’s Rock, it is also known as Cashel of the Kings.

Reputedly the site of the conversion of Aenghus the King of Munster by St. Patrick in the 5th century AD. Long before the Norman invasion The Rock of Cashel was the seat of the High Kings of Munster, although there is little structural evidence of their time here. Most of the buildings on the current site date from the 12th and 13th centuries when the Rock was gifted to the Church. The buildings represent both Hiberno-Romanseque and Germanic influences in their architecture.

To quote from the WIKI entry “The complex has a character of its own, unique and native, and is one of the most remarkable collections of Celtic art and medieval architecture to be found anywhere in Europe.” The Rock is the setting of the fictional “Sister Fidelma Mysteries” mediaeval whodunits from Peter Tremayne.

Webpage

https://heritageireland.ie/places-to-visit/rock-of-cashel/

*Cormac’s Chapel visit is by guided tour only. Last tour is 14:30 daily.
Limited tickets for the interior tour of Cormac’s Chapel can only be purchased at the site. 
Please ring ahead for tour times and details of same as these can change at short notice
Please note there is a short walk , up a steep incline , of approximately 200 metres from the municipal cark park to the entrance of the Rock of Cashel *

Admission

All visitors must have a ticket 

Tickets can be booked online

Adult: €8.00
Group/Senior: €6.00
Child/Student: €4.00
Family: €20.00

Opening Times

Mid March – Early October

Daily 09:00

Last admission 16:45
Average Length of Visit 1 – 1.5 hours

 

Mid October – Mid March

Daily 09:00

Last admission 15:45
Average Length of Visit 1 – 1.5 hours

 

Notice

Closed 24 – 26 December inclusive.

Please note that all groups must be pre-booked.

Tour operators visiting the Rock of Cashel are requested not to drive directly to the site but rather to avail of the nearby car-park.

The tour times of the Chapel and the General Guided tours can change at any time due to weather and if we have works going on inside.

Cormac’s Chapel visit is by guided tour only.

Last tour time is 15:45 and last entry is 16:45.

Limited tickets for the interior tour of Cormac’s Chapel can only be purchased at the site. 

 

Please ring ahead for tour times and details of same as these can change at short notice

Location

St. Patrick’s Rock of Cashel
Cashel
Co. Tipperary
E25 KX44

Tel: 062 61437

Google Maps Location

Facilities

Public toilets and car/coach park close to site
Credit Card Facilities available

 

Watch a Virtual Tour